Scientific article

Jul 11 2022

ILLUMINA MISEQ SEQUENCING REVEALS CORRELATIONS AMONG FRUIT INGREDIENTS, ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS, AND AMF COMMUNITIES IN THREE LYCIUM BARBARUM PRODUCING REGIONS OF CHINA

Abstract: The symbiotic relationship of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) is important for Lycium barbarum, a highly nutritious and medicinal crop. However, the influence of environmental factors on AMF communities remains largely elusive. Based on MiSeq sequencing, we analyzed AMF communities in rhizosphere soils of L. barbarum with growth synchronization in three typical L. barbarum cultivation sites in China. The Zhongning region has poor soils with a high richness of AMF communities. Geographical environmental variances lead to differences in AMF communities which in turn affects the active ingredients of L. barbarum fruit. Furthermore, different genera of AMF showed significant correlations with environmental factors and fruit ingredients. The three genera, Claroideoglomus, Dominikia, and Funneliformis correlated to environmental factors and fruits ingredients in a similar manner affecting the whole sugar (TS) and flavonoids (FLA) contents in the fruits of L. barbarum. Also, these showed a significantly positive correlation with soil pH. This fact was unknown so far due to different soil acidity/ alkalinity in different studies.

Importance: The climatic and ecological environment is a complex phenomenon, involving various environmental factors that regulate the diversity and population distribution structure of AMF communities affecting plant growth, crop composition, and yield. Current studies on the effects of environmental factors on AMF communities have mainly focused on soil conditions and host plants. Fewer studies have been conducted on the correlation between temperature, enzyme activity, plant fruiting, and AMF communities. The present study investigated the diversity of AMF communities and the influence of environmental factors on their distribution patterns, which showed similar effects on some AMF species. The results suggest that screening AMF fungicides that meet the target may significantly help soil restoration reducing the use of chemical fertilizers and a large amount of human and material resources.