Scientific article

Jul 11 2022

COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF GENOME SEQUENCING FOR DIAGNOSING PATIENTS WITH UNDIAGNOSED RARE GENETIC DISEASES

Purpose: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of genome sequencing (GS) for diagnosing critically ill infants and noncritically ill pediatric patients (children) with suspected rare genetic diseases from a United States health sector perspective.

Methods: A decision-analytic model was developed to simulate the diagnostic trajectory of patients. Parameter estimates were derived from a targeted literature review and meta-analysis. The model simulated clinical and economic outcomes associated with 3 diagnostic pathways: (1) standard diagnostic care, (2) GS, and (3) standard diagnostic care followed by GS.

Results: For children, costs of GS ($7284) were similar to that of standard care ($7355) and lower than that of standard care followed by GS pathways ($12,030). In critically ill infants, when cost estimates were based on the length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit, the lowest cost pathway was GS ($209,472). When only diagnostic test costs were included, the cost per diagnosis was $17,940 for standard, $17,019 for GS, and $20,255 for standard care followed by GS.

Conclusion: The results of this economic model suggest that GS may be cost neutral or possibly cost saving as a first line diagnostic tool for children and critically ill infants.